Remember

Going into Memorial Day, I’m preparing for a busy weekend. I’m having some friends over for a cookout on Sunday and then going canoeing with some others on Monday. We’re putting up an aboveground pool to play in all summer today since yesterday was my son’s last day of school. 


During all this activity we don’t want to forget to honor our fallen soldiers.  My son says he wants to say a few words at the cookout and asked me to find a verse that he can use in his “speech.”  We were at his grandmother’s house when he asked me and she mentioned John 15:13 “Greater love has no one than this: to lay down one’s life for one’s friends.”


That’s what it’s all about, isn’t it?  Having the courage to put your life on the line for others.  We honor those that have done that for us this Monday.  We must never forget them.


May is also Older Americans Month, and I think they’re a population that can also be easily forgotten so I’d like to share an organization with you that both honors and helps our older citizens.  It’s called Little Brothers Friends of the Elderly.
Little Brothers coordinates a Friendly Visiting Program, where a volunteer is matched with a friend who is sixty or older and has no support in the area. The volunteer visits the friend at least a couple of times a month with a one year commitment. 


Little Brothers sponsors many other programs as well such as regular phone contact programs. It also provides holiday celebration parties and need cooks, drivers, servers and companions.  Others bring food to elders who aren’t mobile in their homes.  You can also escort elders to medical appointments. 
Little Brothers programs are located in Boston, Philadelphia, Cincinnati, Chicago, Michigan, Minneapolis/St. Paul, Omaha and San Francisco.  If you don’t live in one of these places, there are other ways to help the elderly.
Contact your local Area Agency on Aging by visiting www.eldercare.gov or calling 1-800-677-1116 to find ongoing opportunities to celebrate and support older Americans. 


This year’s theme for Older Americans Month—Never Too Old to Play!—puts a spotlight on the important role older adults play in sharing their experience, wisdom and understanding, and passing on that knowledge to other generations in a variety of significant ways. Older adults continue to bring value to our communities through spirited participation in social and faith groups, service organizations, and other activities. Instead of being stuck somewhere on their own, older people need to get out and be a part of their communities with the help of others.

So let’s remember those who have fallen in service and those who are at the end of their lives, both for having given so much.  Happy Memorial Day!

Comments

  1. I love the personal approach you take with this blog post Anne, have fun this summer in the pool! And thanks for all the good tips. Some of my best friends have been elderly - hey are the ones with all the wisdom so it only benefits the younger crowds to keep them in the loop. Love your blog, thanks for all you do.

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    1. You're so welcome. I have learned so much from my older friends, too. Thank you for your comments.

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  2. I'm now following you. It would be a pleasure to read about you:)
    Here's mine: www.theletterstothejoker.blogspot.com

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    1. Thank you so much! I see you haven't been doing your blog regularly. Hope things are going better for you now.

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  3. volunteers are people who help without caring to receive something in turn. where to find them for ur projects? I guess on social networks like facebook, twitter, blackberry. and lots of people will agree to give a helping hand, we need just to push them for it.

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    1. I find caring people everywhere, and especially on Facebook, where I'm known as the Volunteer and Charity Guru Anne Sanders. Thanks for the comment!

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